Chile – day 10

A few days ago we went to a park in Temuco.  It was beautiful and large and the kids enjoyed running on all the trails.  We could see the whole city from the lookout tower.  Eucalyptus trees are everywhere and also a sort of bamboo looking plant that is called something I don’t remember.  The food is exceptional.  Simple and delicious.  A large piece of our day is spent preparing and eating food and then hand washing dishes for twelve people.  Yes, that’s right.  Life without a dishwasher for a month.  A favorite so far is choripan.  A grilled chorizo sausage stuffed inside the made-fresh-today bread that is absolutely everywhere.  Topped with ketchup or mustard or mayo…so good.  And for us gluten-free ones it is just as good as simply sausage on a plate.  Very fresh and spiced to perfection.  There are nectarinas de platano.  Super sweet local nectarines that we eat a dozen or more of most every day.   And there is palta, even for breakfast, I’ve never eaten so many avocados in my life.  Pebre is on the favorite list too.  I can’t leave here without learning to make it.  A finely diced salad with onions, cilantro and a smattering of other delicious things combined to make an exquisite pile of yumminess that can be eaten alone or on meat or rice or anything.

On our way home from the butcher this week my conversation with Tina went something like this:

Me:  So you said we are grilling steak for dinner yes?

Tina:  Yes that’s right.

Me:   But I heard Rodrigo say something about sausage…

Tina:  Oh, yes, well we’re going to grill sausages for choripan first then have the steak after its done cooking on the grill.

Kyler (chiming in):  Two kinds of meat in one dinner?!  I love meat!

With the bounty of summer produce in full swing and a fantastic butcher in their pocket, we are more than well set for food.  Though I don’t think my friend (and mother of two children) could possibly have imagined the staggering amount of food we would go through our families combined.  It is quite a lot of food!  She has ever so graciously opened up her kitchen to me and welcomed us so fully into their home.

There are all sorts of nuances that are unique to life here.  And very different than our life in the American suberbs.  An Italian man  just pulled onto the property wanting to sell things so he could make money to fly home to Italy.  There is no government welfare system.  No 50% of the population dependent on federal money for subsistence.  So if they have not, they have not.  If they are lucky they have help from a friend or relative.  If not, their options are nothing like the thriving, largely over-used welfare system in the US that has created such incredible dependence on the government.  They turn tricks at main intersections in the city, hoping for a few pesos to be handed out of car windows.   They drive carts with oxen selling seaweed across old cobblestone roads.  No doubt there is much more than we get glimpses of.

Tuesday we all went to the market in town.  Every Tuesday the vendors get fresh produce so the selection and freshness was enough to leave any herbivore drooling.  There were spices in buckets and bags for sale in bulk.  Beans too, gorgeous beans of every kind.  Pickled onions and fresh cheeses and butter laid across counters.  Fresh fish laid out over ice.  There were stray dogs all over.  Rylee’s favorite part was the variety, she said.  There was a man threshing wheat through a wooden strainer and ladies selling fresh cooked wheat used for making some sort of dessert.   Five miles down a dirt road every time we want to go somewhere means one dirty car.  And our water usage at the house for a dozen people has been high so we weren’t about to wash a car with it!  For a few dollars, Tina got her car washed while we shopped.  A man chopped corn with a machete.  A Mapuche (the natives of this area) woman sold cilantro.  There are all sorts of people trying to support their families by selling whatever they are able to.

Our children won’t ever forget this.  Their eyes are opened wide every day.  Smells, sounds, sights and tastes that are all new.  We are so glad to be here and so thankful to be together.

Eating ice cream for Lucas' birthday on Sunday!
Eating ice cream for Lucas’ birthday on Sunday!
There is a drought here.  Tina says she's not see it this dry before....this means very dirty feet and a busy bathtub!
There is a drought here. Tina says she’s not see it this dry before….this means very dirty feet and a busy bathtub!
The view of Temuco from a park on a hill
The view of Temuco from a park on a hill
The kids trying to utilize the merry-go-round at a park
The kids trying to utilize the merry-go-round at a park
To say everyone loves Finn here is an understatement - they call him "el Finn" - and they love watching him eat!
To say everyone loves Finn here is an understatement – they call him “el Finn” – and they love watching him eat!
Oxen pulling a cart of seaweed near the market
Oxen pulling a cart of seaweed near the market
Heading in to the butcher for our meat for the week
Heading in to the butcher for our meat for the week
Not a typical American butcher - nearly every part of the animal is for sale here, ears, head, feet...everything!
Not a typical American butcher – nearly every part of the animal is for sale here, ears, head, feet…everything!
Spices at the market
Spices at the market
Beans and lentils at market
Beans and lentils at market
Cheeses and butter
Cheeses and butter
Kids waiting while Rodrigo and I picked out nectarines
Kids waiting while Rodrigo and I picked out nectarines
The view from the hill on the back of our friends' property
The view from the hill on the back of our friends’ property
Feeding the crew
Feeding the crew
Wood is the heat source here - no fancy heat pumps or central air.  This tractor showed up several times this week with wood for the coming fall and winter.
Wood is the heat source here – no fancy heat pumps or central air. This tractor showed up several times this week with wood for the coming fall and winter.